AT TWENTY PACES, TURN AND INSEMINATE

In the Post-Schiavo era, this is probably the wrong country to bring it up, but the backlash against what "all sides call the 'Wild West' era of infertility treatment" seems to have begun. Couples regularly undergo treatments in which up to 11 embryos are implanted - and then refuse to consider "selective reduction." The result can be multiple births of 3, 4, 5, or more - often with at least one child suffering birth defects or cerebral palsy. As the LA Times reports:

. . . . even if the risks of having multiples are explained thoroughly, many patients -- so desperate to become parents -- simply cannot envision them, experts say. "Families who are in heavy-duty infertility treatment have been down such a long road that it's quite understandable if they brush off the implications," said Patricia Malmstrom of Twin Services, a parent support organization in Berkeley, Calif. "So often we hear, 'Oh, we'd be so blessed, so delighted, after all these years of no children.' They are sort of in a romance about being parents and don't understand the implication for themselves or the babies."

We haven't been there. And maybe you have. So we won't opine. But Malmstrom seems to be on target.

IF SMALL FELLOW BRINGS US GRANDCHILDREN NAMED PHILIPPA AND ALDO, WE WILL SURELY LOVE THEM AS ONLY GRANDPARENTS CAN.
BUT WE MAY ASK THEIR FATHER WHY HE NAMED THEM AFTER "BATTLESTAR GALACTICA" CHARACTERS.

The authors of Freakonomics: A Rogue Economist Explores the Hidden Side of Everything have been getting a lot of attention for their conclusions about the impact of a distinctly African American first name on a child's future. But on Slate.com today, they discuss the most popular baby names among high-income and low-income white families, and how they have shifted over the past 20 years. (We'll just note in passing that the Number One boy's name among high-income families in the 1990s was . . . Benjamin.) They also speculate on the hot names of 2015:

Where, then, will the new high-end names come from? Considering the traditionally strong correlation between income and education, it probably makes sense to look at the most popular current names among parents with the most years of education. Here, drawn from a pair of databases that provide the years of parental education, is a sampling of such names.

So -- Lara, Linden, and Maeve? Meet Johan, Keyon, and Reagan.

YOU SEE, HERE'S THE PROBLEM. A SPORT WHERE THE GREATEST THREAT OF INJURY COMES FROM YOUR CART ISN'T REALLY A SPORT, IS IT?

According to The Journal of Neurosurgery, head injuries are becoming a growing problem for children who play golf. "The biggest dangers are errant swings and golf cart mishaps," the study reports.

April 12, 2005 | Permalink | Subscribe to RSS

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