THAT'S OK. WE'LL TAKE OUR CHANCES.

The New York Times warns that raising a genius can be expensive, which will have all the deterrent effect of alerting parents that if they're raising a piano prodigy, it might get noisy around the house.

THIS IS A SIGNIFICANT SCIENTIFIC DISCOVERY, YET IT WILL INEVITABLY BE OVERSHADOWED BY THE ADULT FILM WITH THE SAME NAME

Find this article in the paper this morning and share it with your young dinophile: Paleontologists digging in China have discovered a "Jurassic beaver," a mammalian fossil that overturns assumptions about the lowly position of our class in prehistoric times. A Smithsonian curator says the find is a "big deal" because “it gives a hint that early mammals were not just these shadowy creatures at the time of dinosaurs,” but were having their own evolution.

ONCE AND FOR ALL DISPROVING THE PREVIOUS THEORY, THAT THEY WERE ALL JUST "DIRTY OLD BIRDS"

Researchers have discovered the hormone which makes older women so prone to birthing twins. To answer your question, yes, this means you should not assume that every slightly older mom with twins had relied on reproductive technology:

One of the researchers, Cornelius Lambalk, said the discovery helped to explain why there was a surge in the number of non-identical twins born to older women at the same time as their general state of fertility was declining due to age. “This rise has not been entirely due to treatment for infertility,” he said. “About half of the increase has been caused by the number of spontaneous multiple pregnancies probably due to the fact that women are delaying childbirth to a later age.”

 A FRESH BATCH OF PUBLISHED GOODNESS

We've finally updated our "Published Articles" sidebar, at right, with a hatful of items that have appeared on newsstands over the past six months or so. A couple of highlights:

* Two "Pop Quiz" celebrity interviews from Scholastic Instructor, the national magazine for teachers. We've been doing this back-page feature for the magazine since the fall, and have posted a pair of our favorites on the site: David Sedaris and Caroline Kennedy. Sedaris you have to click on; he's hilarious. As for Kennedy, we cannot recommend her new book highly enough. "A Family of Poems : My Favorite Poetry for Children" is based on her own family's tradition of children giving parents and grandparents poems in lieu of birthday and other gifts. What we love about the collection is that it proves definitively that actual poems written by great poets are far better for children than the awful stuff publishers try to pass off as children's verse. Have you been wondering when and how to introduce your children to Yeats, Wordsworth, Whitman, Stevens, and company? The time is now, and this book is the way.

* "Foods Under Fire" ran in Parents all the way back in August. It's a look at the foods most likely to cause irrational health scares (bGH, mad cow, etc.), and why pediatric nutrition authorities say you should keep giving your kids milk and meat anyway. What was most interesting to us as we interviewed the experts was their unanimous opinion that you should feed the kids whatever feels right, within reason, but if you're really concerned about fattening them up, STOP GIVING THEM SO MUCH JUICE!

February 23, 2006 | Permalink | Subscribe to RSS

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