NATURE'S PERFECT SNACK

We begin today with praise for the Kid's Meal, as interpreted by Wendy's. We recently purchased one for the little ones during a ride home from a weekend away, and it was perfect. Here's why: It was actually small. Four chicken nuggets, which was two each for Fellow and Tiny, a packet of french fries that couldn't have had more than 20 in it - and the obligatory small soda hijacked by FD himself. The meal was small enough that, at least when shared by two kids, you could actually call it a snack without sounding like a moron. And it had a perfectly acceptable toy inside, unlike the usual video-game zapping-guy knockoff typically found in the McDonald's box. No, we got a sturdy pack of Curious George domino/matching cards for our trouble, which everyone's been enjoying. All for $2.99.

WELL, NOW WE FEEL PRETTY GUILTY FOR JUST TELLING EVERYONE TO RUN OUT TO WENDY'S FOR A HAPPY MEAL

Half of all children in North and South America will become obese by 2010, "and scientists expect profound impacts on everything from public health care to economies," a new study says.

“We have truly a global epidemic which appears to be affecting most countries in the world,” said Dr. Philip James, chairman of the International Obesity Task Force .... "The Western world’s food industries without even realizing it have precipitated an epidemic with enormous health consequences."  

But wait, there's more:

Dr. Phillip Thomas, a surgeon unconnected to the study who works extensively with obese patients in the northwest England city of Manchester, says, “This is going to be the first generation that’s going to have a lower life expectancy than their parents ... It’s like the plague is in town and no one is interested.” 

OK, OK, but in our defense, no one handed out Curious George domino cards with the Black Death.

THIS IS WHY WE'RE STICKING TO CHESS TOURNAMENTS ON THE UPPER WEST SIDE

The French tennis father who routinely drugged his son's opponents by spiking their bottled water with a sedative has been sentenced to eight years after one drugged opponent died in a car accident because he fell asleep at the wheel. Testimony in the man's recent trial stunned many observers, but not so much young tennis players: 

"Parents put pressure on their kids," said Benoit Tauziede, 20, another of the alleged victims, who is now a coach. "A lot of things happen in tennis. They're just all not so obvious."

WE ALWAYS TELL OUR HONEYS TO BIRTH THEIR BABIES BEFORE THEY GO TO C BLOCK

Nostalgic for the early 19th century? No need to be. Apparently, twenty-three states still authorize the shackling of women convicts during labor; Arkansas officials are currently being sued over the practice. (Only a handful of states forbid it, but that number is growing.) The recent Times article on shackling also offers yet another reminder of the value of a strong and potentially sassy delivery nurse, like the kind you might meet on Gray's Anatomy:

Dawn H., an Arkansas prisoner who delivered a baby in custody in 2002, said her guard wanted to shackle her to the bed. "Fortunately," she said, "I had a very wonderful nurse who told the guard I was in her care. I was her patient. And no one was going to shackle me."
 

March 10, 2006 | Permalink | Subscribe to RSS

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