CONSIDER THE POSSIBILITIES FOR ALICE'S "EAT ME," "DRINK ME" SCENES ALONE 

Legendary comics creator Alan Moore (Watchmen, V for Vendetta) is working on

a "porno-graphic" novel in which Dorothy from The Wizard of Oz meets Alice from Alice in Wonderland and Wendy from Peter Pan, and . . . they tell each other X-rated versions of their stories while having hot sex with each other.

And it sounds bloody brilliant. Moore has mined this territory before, and mined it well. His  League of Extraordinary Gentlemen (which is to the extremely ordinary movie based on it as the Bible is to The Ten Commandments) brought together some of the darkest characters in Victorian fiction (Mina Harker, Captain Nemo, Mr. Hyde) to great and gruesome effect, and in his hard-to-find satirical series Top Ten, he answers the questions all comics readers have asked at some point, like what really happens when Mr. Fantastic gets it on with the Invisible Woman?

The Great Ormond Street Hospital for Children, which holds the rights to Peter Pan, claims it must be asked permission for any use of characters like Wendy - and presumably would not give it to Moore - but he says bollocks to that. Consider Lost Girls at the top of FD's Amazon wish list whenever the notoriously slow Moore gets around to finishing it.

APPARENTLY, THE BREAST MILK CREATES AN IMPENETRABLE FORCE FIELD AROUND THE BABY, PROTECTING IT IN THE EVENT OF ANY DANGEROUS FALLS

We don't often take the temperature of the blogosphere, but the recent rollickingly irresponsible Science Times article equating formula-feeding with smoking during pregnancy drew a huge amount of fire. The Times implicitly acknowledged its problems with an extraordinary half-page letters feature the following week. The letters blasted the paper for insensitivity, since many women are simply unable to breastfeed, either for physical reasons or because they need to keep their jobs to support their babies.

Now, as big-time blogger Daniel Radosh has pointed out, George Mason University's Stats.org has shown that, in re one of the article's money shots, yes, babies who are formula-fed, "are less likely to die. . . of injuries!" We recommend reviewing Stats.org's point-by-point dissection of the Times piece. For our money, the largest question it raises is why the American Academy of Pediatrics, relied on as an honest broker by millions of parents, chose to endorse some of the misleading conclusions that appeared in the Times. Hardly anyone disagrees that, all things being equal, it is probably better for babies to be breastfed in the first year than formula-fed. And the AAP is right to promote that view to new parents in its many materials. However, in describing fomrula-feeding, it's a long way from "less preferable" to "life-threatening." One hopes that the academy isn't willfully signing on to misinformation to meet the ends of promoting breastfeeding. We'll all be less poorly served if the academy can't be trusted to tell it like it is.

WELCOME TO KIDSSAYTHEDARNEDESTTHINGS.COM 

Before we enjoyed a night of Broadway theater the other night ("Lieutenant of Inishmore" - recommend it highly; not so much for cat-lovers), we called Fellow from our pre-show dinner, and had this exchange:

"We're seeing a show tonight."
"Is it a classical?"
"You mean musical? No, it's a play."
"Is it on Broadway?"
"Yes, it's a Broadway play."
"Oh, I want to see a classical on Broadway! I've only seen shows on Amsterdam! It's not fair!"

June 26, 2006 | Permalink | Subscribe to RSS

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