NO-TV WEEK UPDATE

Fellow's No-TV Week, as mandated by his public school library, continues to deliver startling results. For example, morning at FD.com HQ usually begins with one child or the other rising first and coming out to the living room to demand TV. If it's Fellow, he'll request "a science show." Then Tiny will come in, see astronomers or paleontologists on the screen, and scream "NOOOO! I want a kid's show! I want a kid's show! Aaargh!" Similarly, if Tiny wakes first, and we put on "a kid's show" for her, then when Fellow joins us, he can be expected to moan, "Hey, I want a science show! It's not fair! It's never fair!"


Which is why the tableau before us yesterday morning was so shocking: Both children, denying themselves TV, got dressed and then worked together to assemble a series of puzzles on our office floor. If that wasn't enough, then came -- the compliments! First, Tiny said to Fellow: "You look very handsome today," then Fellow, fishing for a friendly response told her, "YOU really look like you're ready to get your picture taken today!"


This morning, for the final day of No-TV Week, Tiny awoke first and since she's been struggling with a cold for a couple of days, we gave her medicine and allowed her some viewing time. Then Fellow woke up, heard the distinctly grating sounds of "Caillou," and stood stock-still in the hallway, out of sight of the set, with his hands on his ears, until we turned the TV off and he could enter the room without breaking his vow of avoiding TV all week.

All in all, it was an impressive experiment, and we look forward to repeating it again some other week when there's nothing on that we want to watch.

HOLD ON. ISN'T THIS THE SAME THING THE MONSTER SAID TO THE TOWNSFOLK AT THE END OF "YOUNG FRANKENSTEIN"?

"That sent the wrong signal to people," Bush said. "I learned some lessons about expressing myself maybe in a little more sophisticated manner, you know." The biggest mistake, Bush said, was the abuse of inmates by U.S. guards at Abu Ghraib prison in Iraq.

WON'T YOU HELP THESE HOME-SCHOOLED KIDS DISCOVER THEIR BODIES?


If you're home-schooling your kids, what do you do for phys. ed? According to the Times, many families facing that conundrum look to private classes, and not just because the coaches are skilled:

Even at $37 a class, parents are happy to let someone else instruct their children. ''As a home schooler, you don't get those breaks from your kids,'' said [Raina] McGrath, who works out or socializes with other mothers for the hour. ''It's more like a break for me.''

Really want a break? We can tell you how to get the kids out of your hair for up to six hours a day. . .

FOR A WHALE OF A TIME

26hours1903 As we reported after our Cape Cod vacation a year ago, for education and entertainment, the New Bedford (MA) Whaling Museum is about as good as it gets for your family museum dollar. The latest installment of the Times' "36 Hours" series seconds that opinion, and then struggles mightily but largely succeeds in figuring out what the Hell else to do with the family in the former whaling center. The big news for our Hamptons readers seeking a quality day trip:

Starting July 1, you can take a ferry from Montauk, N.Y., via Block Island, R.I. (631-668-5700, www.vikingfleet.com).

June 2, 2006 | Permalink | Subscribe to RSS

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