IT'S OFFICIAL: WE'RE OLD

The evidence? We've started reading Metropolitan Diary, and one of the items even elicited a smile of recognition from us last week. To compensate, we plan to spend the weekend listening to Husker Du and Jonathan Richman albums. But this really is cute:

I was trying on clothes in Filene's, on Broadway and 79th Street, when I overheard the following conversation between a mother and child in the next cubicle. . . .

''You look great in that dress, Mom.''

''No, I'm not getting it. I don't look good in pink.''

''But I love it. You could just wear it when we're home alone.''

SAVOR THOSE QUIET MOMENTS. OR, ALTERNATELY, RUSH THROUGHT THEM AS FAST AS YOU CAN

Our latest addition to Hell in a Handbasket Watch:

Like many busy parents, [Adi Weber] turned to her stroller for bursts of exercise while her child napped. But she didn't know how far or fast she was going, or whether her workout measured up to the one she got at the gym. That is why she invented the Strollometer, a speedometer for strollers.

YOUR TEACHABLE MOMENT OF THE WEEK

If it holds up, Judge James Robertson's decision requiring the federal government to adapt its paper currency so that blind citizens can tell different bills apart, would be enormously impractical for the feds, not to mention the vending machine industry. It does, however, provide an easy citizenship lesson for the kids: Put a single, a fin, and a sawbuck on the table. Ask the child to tell them apart. Now ask them to do it with their eyes closed. Aha! And so Judge Robertson's order starts to make sense. This news, fundamentally interesting to kids because it deals with money, could spark an excellent conversation about the government's responsibility to accommodate differently-abled people.

OK, now back to making fun of rich parents.

MOM READS TO US, COOKS US DINNER, AND HELPS US WITH OUR HOMEWORK. BUT WHAT SHE REALLY WANTS TO DO IS DIRECT.

Or just pay someone else $4,000 to direct home videos for her:

In six weeks, a handsome beige box would arrive at the Mellodys' home on the Upper East Side. A laminated photograph of their children would be inset on the lid, and inside would be a professionally shot, laboriously edited home movie. A priceless keepsake -- one that happened to come with a price of $4,000. To Mr. Mellody, an investment specialist at Morgan Stanley, paying that kind of money for home movies was just one more step in the longstanding parental strategy of spending money to save time.

IN CASE YOU MISSED IT   

The Times recently offered this roundup of holiday shopping guides for autistic children as well as kids with other major childhood disabilities. Worth a look.

HOW DO YOU TAKE YOUR KIDS, FAT OR BRITTLE?

New York City faces a quandary: Since it began limiting its cafeteria milk choices to skim, 1%, and (not in all schools every day) chocolate skim a year ago, lunchtime milk consumption is down 10%. A coalition promoting greater milk choice for students, Advocates for School Milk Choice, challenged the Department of Ed to stand down and restore more milk choices, including chocolate- and strawberry-flavored froth five days a week, because, they argued, children who didn't like the milk choices were no longer getting enough calcium. But this week the department refused to go back, maintaining that preventing diabetes was their primary concern and that kids could get calcium from other sources if they were to going to insist on holding out for whole.

What should not be lost in this debate is the fact that a group of people went to the trouble of forming a coalition called Advocates for School Milk Choice. And for the record, we're with the city on this one.


December 15, 2006 | Permalink | Subscribe to RSS

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