LITTLE PROFESSOR: THE NEXT GENERATION

21uzmxmurdl_aa174_Last week in this space, we boasted of our success tracking down an original Texas Instruments Little Professor quizzing calculator for Fellow. Turns out, we may not have had to go to the trouble. Sharp apparently makes a pair of calculators with "drill function," one for kids and another, an "Exerciser," for grown-ups fearing the early onset of addlement. Unlike the Little Professor, both of Sharp's devices offer standard calculator functions as well. But based on the Amazon pages, neither appears to be a hot seller. While they certainly lack the design charm of the old TI driller, they might be worth your consideration.

THE FREELANCE DAD MUST-READ SERVICE ARTICLE OF THE WEEK

The estimable Tara Parker-Pope of the Journal recently wrote about sun-protective clothing for kids. We've started to see these clothes everywhere around town but had remained skeptical of their utility, although that was at least in part because of their high cost. Parker-Pope makes a strong case for them, though, especially since the flimsy t-shirts many kids wear outside all day in the summer only offer an SPF of about 5 and, of course, few of us think to put sunscreen on under kids' clothing.

TONIGHT ON FOX: WHEN BIOETHICISTS ATTACK

No one likes fertility more than Freelance Dad, but nothing gives us a headache faster that reading about couples like the Morrisons of Minnesota. Just 24 (in math terms, that's a comfortable decade and a half before the end of child-bearing years), they turned to fertility drugs to get pregnant, specifically Follistim, one complication of which is the possibility of creating a veritable flotilla of fetuses—in the Morrisons' case, six. The children were born on June 12, after 22 weeks of gestation. Three are now dead, and the other three remain in critical condition, with "a small amount of room for hope" that one might survive. The Morrisons, committed Christians who met at Bethany College of Missions, were given the option of selectively aborting one or more fetuses in utero to increase their chances of delivering one or more healthy babies, but declined, leaving the children's fate "in God's hands."

So, bioethicist Alexander Capron of USC, isn't it the height of hypocrisy and arrogance to rely on modern medicine to get pregnant, and then refuse to use those same techniques to ensure the delivery of a healthy child?

"It is always an interesting situation when people rely on modern medicine and talk about God's will -- because if it were simply God's will, then you'd say, 'If you're not becoming pregnant, that must be God's will.' But people instead say, 'No, God's will is that I use medical interventions," he added. "I guess that is a view of God's will . . . If the idea is that you want to be a parent, there are a lot of children out there who need [adoptive] parents. And the notion that you have to use artificial means to become biologically pregnant, and a parent in that way, is not very persuasive to me."

THE PARK WAS A DUD, TO BEGIN WITH. THERE IS NO DOUBT WHATEVER ABOUT THAT.

We had high hopes for the opening of England's newest theme park, Dickens World. But according to this online review from Newsweek, the park is a letdown.

June 19, 2007 | Permalink | Subscribe to RSS

TrackBack

TrackBack URL for this entry:
https://www.typepad.com/services/trackback/6a00d8341c423c53ef00e00982ca798833

Listed below are links to weblogs that reference :

Comments

The comments to this entry are closed.